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The Commons
The Arts

So Percussion explores guns through sound, movement

Tickets are $10-$15 and reservations are highly recommended. For tickets, visit vermontperformancelab.org/events.

Originally published in The Commons issue #375 (Wednesday, September 21, 2016). This story appeared on page B3.



BRATTLEBORO—Vermont Performance Lab presents the innovative percussion quartet So Percussion this September with choreographer Emily Johnson and Director Ain Gordon, who have embarked on the last phase of their multipart residency to support the development and presentation of “A Gun Show,” a multidimensional meditation on guns in the U.S.

So Percussion’s research for “A Gun Show” included Performance Lab residencies dedicated to hunting and interviews with local hunters, sportsmen, and law enforcement officers, according to a news release.

The Performance Lab hosts two preview performances at the New England Youth Theatre on Flat Street in Brattleboro on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 23 and 24, at 7 p.m., before the New York premiere at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival and a tour through New England.

“This timely and powerful work will take audiences on a journey into the ways in which Americans perceive guns and have important conversations in our own community,” VPL Director Sara Coffey said in the news release.

So Percussion formed at the Yale School of Music in 1999, and has cultivated a repertoire focused on contemporary American music, beginning with John Cage and exploring the diversity of today’s musical culture.

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